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greenland
Image courtesy of Andrew Davies

Digging for global warming clues

by Gizem Melek

Scientists will dig up ice in Greenland in search for global warming effects. One of the participants in the project speaks to Skinflint.

Researchers from 18 countries are going to drill deep into North Greenland to extract ice cores.

They hope to get ice cores covering the Eemian Period which is the second-to-latest interglacial period of the Ice Age and ended 150.000 years ago.

As a sample of the period’s rain and snow, the scientists will be able to study on the past climate.

The international research is aimed to find global warming clues which might affect the Earth in the future.

Dr. Jack Triest from the British Antarctic Survey who is going to participate in the project told skinflint, “We would like to get ice from 140.000 year old. If we were to obtain that we can go back to Eemian Period which was the last interglacial when temperatures are slightly high than what they currently are.

By looking into how the climate was then from the ice core, we can better understand how the climate dynamics will work in the future. It will be great to look back and that’s why this research is very unique.”

Scientists will work from May to August on the site and aim to drill 1000 metres depth by the end of July.

The importance of the area is that’s the one which could provide the oldest ice core possible on the Earth.

“When we get ice core from Eemian period which ended 150.000 years ago, we would have an understanding of how we came from a glacial into an interglacial period. It would be great to look back at the last transition that happened and see what the composition was of the atmosphere then and how the climate reacted. That’s what’s very unique about the core that we hope to obtain.”

Whole project is going to finish by 2011.

By the time, scientists are hoping to reach the final depth of 2.5 kilometres.

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